Month: May 2019

Victorious Balm & Serum

Victorious Balm & Serum

Meet Victorious Balm & Serum!   For those serious about using natural ingredients, and serious about taking care of their skin.  Everything your skin needs, and nothing it doesn’t.

Victorious Balm & Serum are created from 100% natural ingredients.  Ingredients carefully selected for very specific benefits. I’ll only touch briefly on the ingredients because their benefits are many and I don’t want to science too much and put you to sleep 😉

Victorious Balm contains ingredients such as Cocoa, Shea & Jojoba butters and more, whipped into a pleasing texture.  It has the added benefits of natural Vitamin E (NOT to be confused with the synthetic colorless variety) for it’s anti-oxidant properties that benefit both your skin and to preserve the Balm naturally.

Cocoa Butter is derived from the Cocoa bean, which contains a significant amount of polyphenol and flavanoid antioxidants, and also has the ‘good’ saturated fats that are easily absorbed and beneficial for healing dry & cracked skin.  Anti-oxidants benefit your skin by limiting the production of free radicals that cause damage.

Shea Butter comes from the seeds of the fruit of the Shea (Karite) tree and that is naturally rich in vitamins A, E and F, and provides the skin with essential fatty acids and the nutrients necessary for collagen production.  A 2010 study by the “College of Science and Technology” found that “due to its cinnamic acid and other natural properties, shea butter was anti-inflammatory. One compound in particular, lupeol cinnamate, was found to reduce skin inflammation and even potentially help avoid skin mutations.” This also makes it beneficial for some people with acne.

Now let’s talk about Victorious Serum. In the beginning, when I first launched it back in 2008, it was known as ‘Serieuse’ and had a base of Almond oil.  It has come a long way since and no longer contains Almond oil (which poses as an allergen for many).

Victorious Serum is a fusion of oils, some of which are Jojoba, Ricebran and more.

Jojojoba oil is derived from the seed of the Simmondsia chinensis (jojoba) plant (pronounced Ho-ho-ba). Jojoba oil contains beneficial ingredients, including vitamin E, vitamin B and more and a very high percentage of iodine which gives jojoba oil its power to heal. Due to anti-inflammatory properties, it can calm & reduce redness and soothe the dry and chapped skin.  Jojoba closely imitates sebum, produced by our sebaceous glands in our skin.  As we age our sebaceous glands produce less sebum, which is why we get dry skin and hair (leading to dandruff or itchy scalp).  On the other hand, too much sebum, which happens during puberty or when hormone levels are high, can result in oily skin and acne. However Jojoba oil is non-comedogenic, meaning it doesn’t clog pores so it keeps your oil levels balanced.  Studies have indicated that Jojoba oil can also accelerate the wound-healing process, and reduce skin lesions.  This is wonderful for Excema and Psoriasis  sufferers.

Ricebran oil is extracted from the germ as well as the husk of rice.  Rice bran oil is light and penetrates easily, with deep-moisturizing capability due to its combination of vitamin E and fatty acids, plus vitamin B to help firm and tighten your skin, maintaining hydration, which helps to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Rice bran oil is considered an anti-aging secret in Japan.  It is a good source of tocotrienols, an antioxidant that is more potent than Vitamin E.  Rice bran oil also contains “squalane” which is known to help your skin look younger and fresher.

Vitamin E is found in both Victorious Balm & Serum and is easily absorbed by your skin.  Vitamin E is not actually a single vitamin, but rather a group of fat-soluble vitamins with antioxidant effects.  Vitamin E will neutralize free radicals in the skin and this aids with healing and reducing scars.  As a natural anti-inflammatory, it can alleviate & soothe eczema or atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis symptoms. The article “Vitamin E & Skin Health“, brought to us by Oregon State University had this to say part “Vitamin E is an integral part of the skin’s antioxidant defenses, primarily providing protection against UV radiation and other free radicals that may come in contact with the epidermis.”   and  “Use of unesterified vitamin E, similar to that found in natural sources, has provided the most consistent data concerning its topical efficacy. The vitamin E family consists of eight different tocopherols and tocotrienols,”

Now these aren’t all of the ingredients, I’d surely put you to sleep extolling ALL of the benefits of ALL of the ingredients.  But you can find the full list on the packaging.

If you’ve made it this far through all that sciencey’ jargon, I’ll tell you a little bit about the packaging.

Yes. It. Is. Green. Of course it is! That’s my favorite color! However, that’s beside the point.   I have always packaged my products, since 2008, in containers that inhibited UV light.  Why?    To protect your investment!

Natural butters and carrier oils are photosensitive to UV light. It ages them and by doing so, reduces their valuable properties and their effectiveness.  When we visit the Salon or Beauty supply and see products on the shelves, ever wonder how long they sat there? Ever wonder for how long they were exposed to UV light? I do, which leads me to question the integrity of the product; how old is it and has it been compromised?  For this reason, to insure the full lifespan of the products, they are packaged in containers to inhibit UV light.     The Serum bottles have the secondary protection of serum-dispensing caps.  By not needing to remove the cap to access product, you reduce the circulation of oxygen in the product. Oxygen can also speed up the aging process of natural ingredients.  An added benefit of these particular serum dispensing caps is that they dispense the exactly right amount of product. One squirt for light treatment of 2 hands, or 2 squirts for a more intense treatment.  Last but not least, the serum-dispensing caps also prevents contamination of your products.  This is ideal for use in a Salon environment, or in a home where you share your products and maybe your cohabitants <cough cough your kids cough cough>   don’t share your your hygienic habit of washing their hands.

I hope you’ve found this information to be as interesting as I did when I began my research back in 2008.  Both products have been through some changes over the years, in an endeavor to reap the best results.

To hear what someone else has to say, please feel free to read this blog post from 2014 regarding my Balm, Victorious Balm Claims A Real Victory.

Victorious Balm really is a BOMB 😉

 

 

UV/LED Nail Lamps are SAFE!

Contrary to News Stations and Click-bait websites that use sensationalism to get clicks and views, Lamps used for nail services are SAFE!!!
Yesterday, Global News aired a news report that claims otherwise. I posted to their Facebook timeline, we’ll see if the moderators of said page approve my post. In the meantime, please review the information further below.
****I encourage you to do your research before you publish ‘news’. With regards to https://globalnews.ca/video/5247290/skin-cancer-can-develop-on-hands-and-around-nails this video…. It’s fear based sensationalism. Scary headlines get the views. How about sharing some true facts? From the inventor of the SPF rating: According to Dr. Robert M. Sayre, Ph.D., of Rapid Precision Testing Laboratories one of the creators of the SPF rating system: “UV Nail Lamps are safer than natural sunlight or sunlamps.” According to Dr. Sayre: “People who are indoors have little to no skin risk due to long-term exposure to fluorescent lighting. People who sunbathe or work outdoors have real risks of excessive UV exposure, the cause of sunburn and skin cancer.” Hands get more UV exposure holding the steering wheel of a car or talking on a cell phone outside than they do from the use of UV nail lamps.”   In addition, here’s a report from a Scientist & his colleagues,  SchoonScientific-UV Nail Lamp Facts and ProBeautyOrg-UV Nail Lamps Little Risk  which states in part “We elected to compare UV nail lamp irradiance with exposure of narrowband UVB (NBUVB) used for phototherapy, in order to provide a perspective with respect to a common and well-known exposure. NBUVB is a commonly used dermatological treatment, viewed as low risk, although not as zero risk, for the development of keratinocyte carcinoma (KC, i.e., basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma).” “.. one would need over 250 years of weekly UV Nail sessions to experience the same risk exposure” ***
To my clients- PLEASE do not apply sunscreen to your hands immediately before an appointment. If you’re applying only because you are afraid of UV exposure from my lamps, then perhaps you shouldn’t leave the house as you’ll receive more exposure in your travels TO my location than you will receive during services AT my location. Additionally, sunscreen can inhibit and/or prevent nail enhancement products from bonding to the nail plate and you’ll experience lifting as a result.
Have faith in me, that I am a trained professional and well versed on the safety of the products and equipment at my table. Please don’t be shy to ask questions, and/or verify the veracity of the articles I’ve shared herein.
Source of image unknown- Additional Images found here that you can share to raise awareness: https://www.facebook.com/pg/victoriousnailstyles/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1236268623204033
14May2019 / EDITED TO ADD
In part, it states “ But the FDA views nail curing lamps as low risk when used as directed by the label. For example, a 2013 published studyExternal Link Disclaimer indicated that—even for the worst case lamp that was evaluated—30 minutes of daily exposure to this lamp was below the occupational exposure limits for UV radiation. (Note that these limits only apply to normal, healthy people and not to people who may have a condition that makes them extra sensitive to UV radiation.) To date, the FDA has not received any reports of burns or skin cancer attributed to these lamps.”

When do I need a New Set of Nails?

This week I was asked (not for the first time) “When do I need to take off my nails and get a new set?” The answer is “Never”. You NEVER “Need” to do a removal & new set, except if you’re going to surgery and the Doctor says so.
New Sets are ‘optional’, and not a necessity. Want and Need are two different things.
A: You may “WANT” a New Set if
  1. Your natural nails don’t grow into what you consider a perfect shape, and you want a new set to create the illusion of perfectly shaped nails (maybe your nails grow into a hooked shape downwards, maybe they don’t have a nice c-curve,etc)
  2. Artistic reasons. Maybe you want some encapsulated nail art (ie: dried flowers, snake skin, scorpion, butterly wings, feathers, etc) and have something ‘inside’ the acrylic/gel. OR you want “Stained Glass” or “Jelly Nails” where the end of your nail is see-through (because your natural nail certainly isn’t see-through. Then you’ll need a new set.
  3. You want to change the shape from Almond to Coffin or Oval to Square, etc. Then to increase the surface area for that required shape, a new set is required.
  4. You want to change systems (ie: from Acrylic natural nail overlay to IBX Boost gel overlay). This is two entirely different services that don’t work together.

Sculpting New Set

B: It has been my experience that salons that frequently require new sets are either one or all of the following:
  1. It’s a Cash Grab (they can charge you for the removal, and more for a new set than for a rebalance)
  2. They use MMA (Illegal & cheap) Acrylic that yellows  horribly with age and the nails look shoddy, so require a new set to make them look nice.
  3. They don’t do the refills/rebalances properly (rushed services), and you can see unattractive fill lines from previous services in your acrylic/gel
  4. The tech is poorly trained and/or inexperienced and not that good at rebalances/refills yet, and finds it easier to start fresh. (fair enough, give her time, she’ll get there)

NSS MMA Nails

C: But what about if you’re wearing nails from another nail salon and the tech says “I don’t work on top of anyone elses’ work, have to remove and do a new set”. This is common practice, but not always necessary.
  1. Some do it because they are afraid of bacteria being caught under the product from the old salon and don’t want to be held accountable for any infection that might occur as a result (especially true if your former salon is NSS/discount nail bar that doesn’t do things properly) and they do this in the interest of protecting your nail health, and their business. Fair enough.
  2. Some do it because what is already on your nails may be poorly done and not look good, and doesn’t make a good foundation for what you asked us to make your nails to look like. Sometimes we can’t fix what’s there. Sometimes, it’s such a disaster, that to ensure you leave OUR table happy, we have to & need to start anew.
  3. Other nail techs do it because some products don’t play well with other products and to avoid any issues, will only work on product they have applied themselves. For example: if you had gel applied, and are seeking acrylic services. Acrylic won’t bond to gel, so it is necessary to start afresh. OR you are wearing DIP nails and are switching to traditional Acrylic or UV Gel, then it’s necessary to start anew.
Here, at Victorious Nail Styles, it’s decided on a case-by-case basis. Most of the time, a Removal & New Set is NOT necessary and this includes nails done at another salon. More often than not, I can do what is called a Reconstruction on nails previously done elsewhere.
There is absolutely no benefit to you -the client- to routinely remove your nails for a new set. Removal is harsh on your nail plates due to the necessary soaking in acetone (very drying) and the filing & buffing of the natural nail plate to be 100% certain that all traces of product was removed. So unless you want to change the look for reasons such as discussed in Section A, OR there is visible sign or potential for infection; then just keep getting refilled/rebalanced. If the removal is required such as listed in section B, either change salons OR accept that the novice tech will improve her skills with time and be patient with her as we all start somewhere.
All in all, usually a new set is wanted (by either tech or client), but rarely needed.
(Also found on my Facebook Biz Page in the Notes Tab “When do I need a new set?